Cardigan Island Coastal Farm Park

Camping at Cardigan Island Coastal Farm Park


OPENING DATES & TIMES

Opening dates for 2017 are from
1st April 2017 to
4th November 2017
.

Opening times are
10am until 6pm
from 1 April until 30 September.

From 1st October until 4 November, 10am until 5pm.

CLOSED from:
November 5 2017.
Re-open 1 April 2018.

 

ENTRY PRICES
£3--90 [14yrs and over]
£2--90 [2yrs to13yrs]
FREE [under 2yrs]
£3--50 [OAPs]

Prices include V.A.T.



Cardigan Island
Coastal Farm Park

Gwbert-on-Sea,
Cardigan, Ceredigion,
West Wales, UK
SA43 1PR

Call: 01239 623 637
Fax: 01239 612 196
Email:
info@cardiganisland.com


Come to Cardigan Island Coastal Farm Park for
Cardigan Island
Atlantic Grey Seals
Emus
Dolphins in the wild
Island views
Goats
Amazing scenery
NEW Kune Kune and Mangalitza [curly] pigs.


Visit Cardigan

Visit Dubai

 

Seals

Seal at Cardigan Island

A colony of Atlantic grey seals breed in the many caves that are located beneath the farm park's cliffs and around Cardigan Island.

The seals are seen virtually every day that the park is open, from March to the beginning of November.

The seals are seen "bottling" or floating vertically in the sea, at most times, staring back at the "strange visitors" standing on the cliff tops!

At low tide, especially in warm weather, the seals can often be seen "hauled out", sunning themselves, on exposed rocks.

There is a large, flat rock between the park and the island called Carreg Lydan ('Broad Rock' in English) which sometimes has as many as 20 seals basking on it.

The unique shape of the coast here, being right-angled with the island stretched across the corner, ensures that there is always sheltered calm water on one side.

The seals invariably move a few yards to the sheltered side. There are good viewing points on both sides of the corner.

The Welsh name for a seal is "morlo" - literally "sea-calf" since the seal's head resembles that of a calf.

Interestingly, the German name is "seehund" or "sea dog". The reason is that the seals generally seen in the Baltic and North Sea Coasts off Germany are common seals and not Atlantic greys. The common seal has a smaller head with a more pointed nose, resembling a dog.